Canadian Migration Institute

May 16, 2012

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Canadian Migration Institute | Institut Canadien de la Migration
Educate Accredit Advocate
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April 8, 2011 - CMI video tells the real story about immigration consultants
April 11, 2011 - Just the Facts - Discipline
April 12, 2011 - Just the Facts - Hidden Costs
April 14, 2011 - Just the Facts - Opening the Floodgates
April 15, 2011 - Video exposes substandard consumer protection at ICCRC
April 18, 2011 - Just the Facts -Time for Action
 


April 18, 2011

Just the Facts – Time for Action

Now that you know the facts about ICCRC it is time to act.

Do you want a regulator…

  • with no experience and no education standards?
  • that will require members to pay for their own audits and investigations?
  • that will lower standards and open the floodgates to low-skill consultants?
  • that will give revoked members a chance to re-enter your profession?

In case you missed them, see CMI’s website for detailed fact sheets on ICCRC. Here’s a summary of how ICCRC stacks up:


You have until 5 PM Eastern time today to STAND UP FOR YOUR PROFESSION.


Let the government know how you feel about ICCRC and its ill- thought-out policies. Submit a comment to Citizenship and Immigration Canada to tell them what you think about their proposal, how it will impact you and the reputation of your profession.



Send your comment with the subject “Comments on Canada Gazette, Part I, published on March 19, 2011” to:


Mark Davidson

Acting Director General

Immigration Branch
Citizenship and Immigration Canada

365 Laurier Ave. W.

Ottawa, ON K1A 1L1
Phone: (613) 941-8989

Fax: (613) 941-9323

Email: mark.davidson@cic.gc.ca


 


 

April 15, 2011

Video exposes substandard consumer protection at ICCRC

Lower admission standards, weakened continuing professional development, no rules, fewer investigators, the list goes on. That’s what members and consumers will face if ICCRC becomes regulator. Watch the video to learn more.


 



April 14, 2011

Just the Facts – Opening the Floodgates

Being a CCIC is a matter of pride because we work hard to meet the strict standards set out by our regulator. Without standards, it’s not a profession. Without standards, we have nothing to be proud of. It’s also crucial that those standards are enforced uniformly and fairly against everyone.

Unfortunately if ICCRC takes control admission into the profession will be anything but fair. To join ICCRC each prospective member have to be sponsored by an existing member. And at the transition point there will be just a handful of members: the unelected Board of Directors.

Click to enlarge

In practice this group will have total veto power over which current CSIC members can obtain ICCRC membership and maintain their right to practice. While it’s true that CSIC initially had an unelected board, today members have a mature, democratic regulator and there’s no reason to take such a big step backward. And the CSIC board never had the power to decide who could enter the profession so that they could put their competition out of business.

Not only will ICCRC have the absolute power to veto member applications on whim, but they’ll open the floodgates to a batch of less-qualified consultants. For them it’s a numbers game: lower standards means more members, so that they can offer lower fees at the expense of quality. These cut-rate consultants will hold the same accreditation that we do, so consumers won’t know the difference.

But for now, ICCRC has no standards at all and it will take them at least a year to develop them. We know that they want to scrap the internationally recognized language tests employed by CSIC, presumably so that people that failed to meet CSIC’s requirement can enter the profession. Even if you can’t speak English or French, if your money is green you’ll be welcomed as a member of ICCRC.

Worse still, ICCRC won’t require its members to take quizzes to prove they’ve learned anything from their CPD courses. If you were sick, would you want a doctor that hadn’t learned about new treatments developed in the last decade? That’s what consumers will be faced with if ICCRC becomes regulator.

Ultimately lower standards will erode consumer confidence in immigration consultants. And when consumers aren’t confident in a service, they won’t pay for it.

Find out for yourself. Read this fact sheet to learn more about how ICCRC will weaken standards, governance and accountability and what it means for you and your profession. Check the Twitter feed regularly for more information. And visit the CMI discussion board to speak up and unite with your colleagues to protect your profession.

It is time to STAND UP FOR YOUR PROFESSION

Let the government know how you feel about ICCRC and its ill- thought-out policies. Submit a comment to Citizenship and Immigration Canada to tell them what you think about their proposal, how it will impact you and the reputation of your profession. Send your comment by April 18 with the subject “Comments on Canada Gazette, Part I, published on March 19, 2011” to:

Mark Davidson
Acting Director General
Immigration Branch
Citizenship and Immigration Canada
365 Laurier Ave. W.
Ottawa, ON K1A 1L1

Phone: (613) 941-8989
Fax: (613) 941-9323
Email: mark.davidson@cic.gc.ca

 



April 12, 2011

Just the Facts - Hidden Costs

There’s no getting around it: being a professional is costly because it requires that we must obtain and maintain specialized education and training in order to earn a professional accreditation. Education costs, registration costs, it all adds up. In exchange for the right of self-regulation, we have to pay our own way. Because of the nature of the services we provide there is a necessity for consumers to place a great deal of trust in us, which is why we have to abide by strict ethical and moral regulations. It’s not always easy, but it’s a point of pride that we share with lawyers, accountants doctors, and other regulated professionals.

To date, CSIC members have invested $37 million in building their regulator. Now, ICCRC wants to throw away all that work and start over.

Not only that, they’ve promised lower fees too. Think about that for a second. ICCRC has no office staff, no furniture, no education standards, no IT infrastructure, no Rules of Professional Conduct and no complaints and discipline process. And yet they’re promising to build all of these things and reduce member fees at the same time. How is that possible?

Click to enlarge

It’s not possible. Sure, we can expect lower fees for the first year, mostly thanks to a sizable taxpayer subsidy. But sooner or later ICCRC will have to admit that they can’t build and run a regulator on a shoestring budget. When that happens, watch as fees skyrocket.

Of course they’ve got another trick up their sleeve: lower standards that will allow them to spread their costs across a greater pool of members. Watch for more details on weakened standards tomorrow.

Read this fact sheet to learn out the truth about the hidden costs, waste and uncertainty that you’ll face if ICCRC becomes regulator. Check the Twitter feed regularly for more information. And visit the CMI discussion board to speak up and unite with your colleagues to protect your profession.

It is time to STAND UP FOR YOUR PROFESSION

Let the government know how you feel about ICCRC and its ill- thought-out policies. Submit a comment to Citizenship and Immigration Canada to tell them what you think about their proposal, how it will impact you and the reputation of your profession. Send your comment by April 18 with the subject "Comments on Canada Gazette, Part I, published on March 19, 2011" to:

Mark Davidson
Acting Director General
Immigration Branch
Citizenship and Immigration Canada
365 Laurier Ave. W.
Ottawa, ON K1A 1L1

Phone: (613) 941-8989
Fax: (613) 941-9323
Email: mark.davidson@cic.gc.ca



April 11, 2011

Just the Facts - Discipline

Our profession is in crisis.

Fellows have to fight to ensure that our profession remains worthy of respect by defending the regulator that holds us to high professional standards and has the best interest of our clients at heart. Last week, CSIC filed a lawsuit against the government in response to its proposal to replace CSIC with an inexperienced and woefully ill prepared group that doesn’t know the first thing about regulating a profession like ours. The lawsuit alleges that the selection process for the proposed regulator was biased and that the rules for the process were broken.

A fair process would not have selected a regulator with no experience, no standards and no rules. A fair process wouldn’t have selected a regulator that will force consumers to wait for years for effective protection. And yet that is exactly what we are faced with.

Click to enlarge

The ICCRC doesn’t care about building a profession that protects consumers by holding its members accountable for their actions. As a matter of fact, they want to slash standards so they can increase their membership.

Did you know that ICCRC plans to open the profession to more than 900 individuals who were shut out or revoked by CSIC? These unqualified and sometimes dishonest consultants will have the same professional designation as you and they’ll compete with you in the marketplace.

For example, ICCRC would let revoked member, Sukjinder Sandhu (from Ontario) apply to reenter your profession despite the fact that an independent discipline panel revoked his membership because he breached CSIC’s rules which are designed to protect consumers.  Sandhu forged a retainer agreement with a client and provided the forgery to a CSIC investigator, he lied to CSIC, his clients and the discipline panel, he filed a forged document in Small Claims Court, accepted retainers from clients and then did not do any significant work in return. 

Does allowing revoked members back into the profession sound like it’s good for you? Does that sound like it’s good for your clients? Does that sound like it’s good for your profession?

Equally bad, ICCRC will give a “get out of jail free card” to the CSIC members who currently under investigation or facing a disciplinary hearing.

As professionals, we should insist that our peers are held accountable for their actions. But ICCRC clearly doesn’t agree.

Find out for yourself. Read this fact sheet to learn more about where ICCRC stands on discipline and what it means for you and your profession. Check back regularly for more information. And visit the CMI discussion board to speak up and unite with your colleagues to protect your profession.

It is time to STAND UP FOR YOUR PROFESSION

Let the government know how you feel about ICCRC and its ill- thought-out policies. Submit a comment to Citizenship and Immigration Canada to tell them what you think about their proposal, how it will impact you and the reputation of your profession. Send your comment by April 18 with the subject "Comments on Canada Gazette, Part I, published on March 19, 2011" to:

Mark Davidson
Acting Director General
Immigration Branch
Citizenship and Immigration Canada
365 Laurier Ave. W.
Ottawa, ON K1A 1L1

Phone: (613) 941-8989
Fax: (613) 941-9323
Email: mark.davidson@cic.gc.ca Subject: Comments on Canada Gazette, Part I, published on March 19, 2011

 

 


 

April 8, 2011

CMI video tells the real story about immigration consultants

Who's looking out for us? Not the government who portrayed all immigration consultants as crooked in a national ad campaign and then tried to destabilize our profession by introducing an inexperience regulator. This ad is a strong reminder of the consequences for our profession if the government gets its way.

 

 
 
 
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